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Reptiles

  • Leopard geckos make great pets for the children and adults. They do not require elaborate set-ups and have a 10-15 year life span with good health care, a clean environment, and proper feeding.

  • A wild reptile typically spends many hours a day basking in the sun, absorbing ultraviolet (UV) light; necessary for the manufacture of vitamin D3. Vitamin D3 is manufactured in the skin and is required for proper calcium absorption from food. Failure to provide UV light can predispose a pet reptile to nutritional metabolic bone disease, an overly common condition of pet reptiles that is fatal if not recognized and treated. Bulbs should be replaced every six months or as directed by the manufacturer. Regular exposure to natural direct sunlight outside is encouraged and recommended whenever possible. Most reptile owners are advised by veterinarians to keep light exposure and temperature variations consistent in their pet’s enclosure to help reptiles maintain appropriate body temperatures and feeding cycles and to stimulate proper immune function, thereby helping keep pets healthy.

  • Wayland Animal Clinic's list of local veterinary dermatologists

  • Grief is the normal and natural response to the loss of someone or something. When grieving, one is said to be in a state of bereavement. The loss of a pet can cause intense grief and sorrow. Given that so many people consider their pets as members of the family, this grief is normal and understandable. Each person experiences grief in a different way. Contrary to popular belief, grief does not unfold in clean, linear stages, nor does it have a timeline. Grief is a full body experience that includes physical, emotional, cognitive, social, and spiritual responses. A healthy grief journey comes from taking the time to work through feelings rather than trying to push them away, moving toward the experience of loss to learn to live with it. There are many ways to manage grief, including receiving support from others, finding comfort in routines and play, keeping active, taking breaks from the sadness, remembering your pet, memorializing your pet, searching for meaning, and eventually, possibly bringing a new pet into your life. Grieving takes time. Usually it gradually lessens in intensity over time, but if it doesn’t, then professional counseling may help.

  • Marbofloxacin is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat certain bacterial infections including leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, and hemoplasmosis. Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other quinolones, or in small and medium breed dogs before 8 months of age, in large breed dogs before 12 months of age, in giant breed dogs before 18 months of age, or in cats before 12 months of age. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Meloxicam is given by mouth or injection and is used to treat general and surgical pain, inflammation, fever, and osteoarthritis. Side effects are uncommon but may include upset stomach, changes in urination, or yellowing of the skin. Do not use in pets that are sensitive to NSAIDs, have kidney or liver disease, are dehydrated or anorexic, or are currently taking other steroids or NSAIDs. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Metronidazole is given by mouth or injection and is used off-label to treat certain anaerobic bacterial and protozoal infections and gastrointestinal conditions in dogs, cats, and other animals. Give as directed. Side effects may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, regurgitation, decreased appetite, tiredness, and drooling. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, are debilitated, or are pregnant or nursing. If a negative reaction occurs, contact your veterinarian.

  • Nitenpyram is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat adult flea infestations and fly larvae infestations. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effect is itchiness. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, in pets that weigh less than 2 pounds, or in pets younger than 4 weeks old. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Nystatin is an antifungal, given by mouth in the form of a tablet or liquid suspension, and used off label to treat Candida fungal infections in dogs, cats, birds, and reptiles. Side effects are rare, but at high doses could cause stomach upset or mouth irritation. It should not be used in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Several species of snakes are commonly kept as pets including king snakes, rat snakes, garter snakes, corn snakes, various pythons, and various boa constrictors. Some snakes, especially the ball python, may not eat for weeks to months after the stress of going to a new home and new environment. Snakes shed their skin every few weeks as they grow. A healthy snake in a healthy environment sheds its old skin in one piece. Young, captive-raised animals make the best pets. Within 48 hours of your purchase, your snake should be examined by a qualified reptile veterinarian. Like all pets, snakes should be examined at least annually, and a fecal examination, looking for parasites, should be part of every examination.